Wu Wisdom: "Tang is the slang, Wu is the way"

The following is an excerpt from RZA's "Tao of Wu." Studying with Sifu, I learned that kung fu was less a fighting style and more about the cultivation of the spirit. What made a Shaolin monk so tough was his mastery of chi—the fact he could make contact with the Earth and draw the energy from it through him. His chi translates as “the grand extreme” and breaks all ideas, forces, and objects into opposites, yin and yang. But wu-chi, which translates as “no extremes,” came before tai chi. It’s...

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Wu Wisdom: The Three Teachings

The following is an excerpt from RZA's "The Wu-Tang Manual." The Tao means, basically, the "Way." It refers to the flow of life, the way nature expresses itself. Taoism teaches you to unite your actions with the flow of the universe. You want to be spontaneous and free from outside influences like social institutions. Confucianism, on the other hand, is more life a concept of government, conduct, and social order. So they seem like opposites, but in Chinese society, they along with Buddhism combine to form a general approach to...

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